5 Common Health Concerns for Seniors

senior careWith today’s advancements in technology and healthcare, people can expect to live longer than ever before. The older population is becoming greater than the younger populations. In the U.S. alone, individuals who are 85 years and older make up one of the fastest growing segments of the population.

In 2012, there was an estimated 5.9 million people over 85 years of age in the U.S., a number that has only grown. And sometimes, growing older brings its own challenges.

If you have a loved one that is aging, it is crucial to look out for these common health concerns for seniors.

1. Heart disease
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is the leading killer of adults over age 65. This chronic condition can lead to other health issues, including stroke and high blood pressure.

2. Arthritis
This debilitating condition affects most seniors and leads to a low quality of life and chronic pain. For many sufferers, investing in senior care is a successful way for them to cope with treatment.

3. Cancer
Cancer is the second leading cause of death in seniors according to the CDC. Living with cancer can be incredibly debilitating and requires almost constant care.

4. Alzheimer’s/Dementia
Because the diagnosis of this condition can be challenging, it can be difficult to know if your loved one is suffering. Living with dementia can be incredibly hard, and more often than not, patients need 24 hour home care for protective supervision to ensure their safety.

5. Diabetes
Not only does this condition affect one’s diet, it affects their lifestyle as well. Diabetics are typically on a restricted diet, and must be incredibly diligent in their lifestyle.

If your loved one suffers from one of these conditions, then consider investing in in home care. Senior care allows your loved one to stay comfortable in their own home, while giving you peace of mind that they are under quality care. Know you are not alone in this process, as there are 65.7 million informal and family caregivers providing care to someone in the United States. This method of care is also projected to grow. By 2050, the number of individuals using paid long-term care services is set to double from the 13 million using services in 2000 to 27 million people.

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